Santa Barbara Zoo - Condors Condor Country

Meet the Santa Barbara Condors

Four juvenile California condors arrived in Santa Barbara in March 2009 to take up residence in the new Condor Country exhibit. The Zoo’s four birds are listed in the Condor Recovery Program Studbook by numbers 432, 433, 439 and 440. They were all hatched at the Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey (Boise, ID) within a two-week period from April 12 through 24, 2007.

All four birds are the direct descendents of the small group of last wild-born flying condors in California who were all ultimately captured in January 1986. These four birds are too closely related to breed to each other and will move to a Condor Recovery Program breeding facility when they reach maturity, between ages six and eight.

In February 2010, a young adult female California condor joined four juvenile condors on exhibit. The condor, number 327, arrived at the Zoo in early January from the Peregrine Fund's World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise, Idaho. After a month-long quarantine, she was released into the exhibit.

Number 327 helps show guests the different stages of condor maturation. At age six, she has the bright pink and orange head of a young adult, contrasting with the gray-headed juveniles. She also adds to the variety of condor behavior and provides an array of adult behavior for the juveniles to experience.

 

Number 327

Number 327 is a female condor who hatched at the Peregrine Fund's World Center for Birds of Prey (Boise, Idaho) on April 11, 2004, and was hand raised. At age eight months, she was transferred to the Vermilion Cliffs condor release site in northern Arizona.

After she was released and recaptured twice between January 2005 and June 2009. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Condor Recovery Program decided that she be placed in Santa Barbara because she had several close interactions with humans. These interactions could result in undesirable human-oriented behavior in the future and put the bird at risk of injury, of ingesting something harmful (like microtrash), and of taking those dangerous behaviors back to the wild flock.

She arrived in Santa Barbara in January 2010 and went on exhibit after a 30-day quarantine, in mid-February.

Number 432

Number 432 is a male condor who hatched on April 12, 2007, at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise), where he were raised by his parents.

After his great-great-grandparent, a wild condor known as AC3 (#10 in Condor Recovery Studbook), died of lead poisoning, the decision was made to bring in all the remaining wild condors from the wild in January 1986.

Number 432’s grandparents were all hatched in captivity and hand-raised, with the exception of #5 (known as AC6). Number 5 has been incredibly productive and sired (fathered) more than 20 eggs; he still lives at the breeding facility at the Los Angeles Zoo.

Number 432’s parents were both hatched at the breeding facility at the Los Angeles Zoo, where they were hand-raised. They have lived at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise) since 1997 and have produced an amazing ten eggs. Some chicks have been hand-raised, others raised by condor foster parents, and they have raised two, including #432.

Number 433

Number 433 is a female condor who hatched on April 12, 2007, at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise), where she were raised by condor foster parents.

After her great-great-grandparent, known as AC3 (#10 in Condor Recovery Studbook) died of lead poisoning, the decision was made to bring in all the remaining wild condors from the wild in January 1986.

Number 433’s grandparents were all hatched in captivity and hand-raised, except for #2, who is a wild male condor who was never captured. Many of his eggs with his wild mate #11 (known as Tama) were taken by researchers to be hatched and raised by hand.

Number 433’s dam (mother) was hatched at the Los Angeles Zoo; her sire (father) was hatched at the breeding facility at the San Diego Wild Animal Park. In September 1993, they were in the first group of condors to be transferred to the breeding facility at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise), where they have produced an amazing 12 eggs. Some chicks have been hand-raised, others raised by the parents, and a few have been raised by condor foster parents, including #433.

Number 439

Number 439 is a male condor who hatched on April 22, 2007, at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise), where he was raised by his parents.

After his great-great-grandparent, known as AC3 (#10 in Condor Recovery Studbook) died of lead poisoning, the decision was made to bring in all the remaining wild condors from the wild in January 1986.

Two of #439’s grandparents were hatched in captivity and hand-raised; one was a wild bird who had been captured for the Recovery Program; and another was captured as a chick in a wild nest to become the first member of the captive breeding program.

Number 439’s parents were both hatched at the breeding facility at the San Diego Wild Animal Park and hand-raised. They have both lived at the breeding facility at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise) since 1997, where they have produced seven eggs. Some chicks have been hand-raised, others raised by condor foster parents and they have raised two, including #439.

Number 440

Number 440 is a female condor who hatched on April 24, 2007, at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise), where she was raised by her parents.

Her great-great-great-grandparents, #2 and #11 (known as Tama) produced the last egg hatched in the wild – her great-great-grandparent, #21 (known as AC8).

All her other great-grandparents and two grandparents were also hatched in the wild, but either died in the wild or were brought into captivity as part of the Recovery Program.

Her parents were both hatched at the breeding facility at the San Diego Wild Animal Park and hand-raised. They have both lived at the breeding facility at the Center for Birds of Prey ( Boise) since September 1997, where they have produced five eggs. Two chicks were raised by condor foster parents and three were raised by them, including #440

Photo credits:Chuck Graham, Sheri Horiszny, David Orias